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Chapter Books & Series for Girls

 (AR book levels are in parentheses)

*11 Birthdays by Wendy Mass   (4.1-4.6)
After celebrating their first nine same-day birthdays together, Amanda and Leo, having fallen out on their tenth and not speaking to each other for the last year, prepare to celebrate their eleventh birthday separately but peculiar things begin to happen as the day of their birthday begins to repeat itself over and over again.




*Agent Amelia by Michael Broad    (4.6-5.2)
The first title in a new series introduces a delightful new character to emerging readers — the intrepid and resourceful Agent Amelia, Secret Agent, who saves the world from evil geniuses and criminal masterminds thanks to her clever disguises, great gadgets (which sometimes work), and her brilliance at improvising in sticky situations.




*Allie Finkle by Meg Cabot   (4.9-5.2)
When nine-year-old Allie Finkle's parents announce that they are moving her and her brothers from their suburban split-level into an ancient Victorian in town, Allie's sure her life is over. She's not at all happy about having to give up her pretty pink wall-to-wall carpeting for creaky floorboards and creepy secret passageways-not to mention leaving her modern, state-of-the-art suburban school for a rundown, old-fashioned school just two blocks from her new house.


*American  Girl Series by Various Authors  (4.0-5.5)
Felicity falls in love with a beautiful horse named Penny. When she discovers that the owner is cruel, she is determined to find a way to save Penny.
In Williamsburg in 1774, nine-year-old Felicity rescues a beautiful horse who is being beaten and starved by her cruel owner.
*Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery (5.9-8.6)
Precocious, talkative Anne comes from an orphanage to live on a Canadian farm, where the lively 11-year-old transforms her guardians' placid world with her fanciful chatter and innocent mischief. Anne's goodwill, intelligence, and joie de vivre ultimately endear her to her friends and neighbors as well as readers everywhere.
*Beacon Street Girls by Annie Bryant    (4.3-5.3)
Yikes! As if being the new girl isn't bad enough, Charlotte just made the biggest cafeteria blunder in the history of Abigail Adams Junior High. There's no way that Katani, Avery, and Maeve will want anything to do with her now.

Can a mysterious landlady, a romantic evening gone wrong, and a cryptic key to nowhere help four very different girls become the best of friends? Or will they remain worst enemies forever?


*Candy Apple by Various Authors   (3.9-4.8)
Candy Apple is a fresh, fun take on fiction for girls: a new line with pep and pizzazz targeted at the solid middle-grade reader.  When shy Sophie's best friend, Kylie, signs them both up for cheerleading tryouts, it's Sophie who lands in the spotlight - and Kylie ends up on the sidelines. Now Kylie is stuck playing mascot, and she doesn't exactly get along with Sophie's new friends on the squad.  Things really spin out of control right before the big game, and Sophie has to choose sides. Can the girls rediscover how to root for each other before the clock runs out on their friendship?

*Cinderella Smith by Stephanie Barden  (4.2-4.3)
Cinderella Smith has problems with a capital P. Her new teacher laughs at her name, she has to sit at the smart-boys table, and her old best friend is ignoring her. Now the new girl, Erin, has asked for her advice on wicked stepsisters. But Cinderella doesn't have any stepsisters, wicked or otherwise! And to make things worse, she's got to find her ruby red tap shoe before the fall dance recital!  How will Cinderella solve her capital P problems before it's too late?


*Clementine by Sarah Pennypacker   (3.9-4.5)

Clementine is having not so good of a week. On Monday she's sent to the principal's office for cutting off Margaret's hair. Tuesday, Margaret's mother is mad at her.  Wednesday, she's sent to the principal again.  Thursday, Margaret stops speaking to her.  Friday starts with yucky eggs and gets worse.  And by Saturday, even her mother is mad at her.  Okay, fine. Clementine is having a DISASTROUS week.


*The Critter Club by Callie Barkley  (3.0-3.4)
It’s Spring Break in Santa Vista, and everyone has big plans...everyone except for Amy, that is! As her best friends head out of town on exciting adventures, Amy resigns herself to helping out at her mom’s vet clinic. At least she’ll be around cute animals! But when Santa Vista’s cold and elusive millionaire, Marge Sullivan, brings her puppy Rufus for a check-up, Amy encounters an unexpected mystery. After her friends return home, the girls get to the bottom of what happened to Rufus—and discover a way to help other lost and lonely animals in their town.

*Cupcake Diaries by Coco Simon   (3.8-4.0)
This first book in The Cupcake Diaries is told through the perspective of Katie Brown. We find Katie miserable on the first day of middle school. Her best friend Callie came back from camp boy-crazy and part of a whole new group of friends. When it's made clear that Callie is in the PGC (Popular Girls Club) and Katie is not invited to join, Katie suddenly feels incredibly alone. Katie realizes if she’s going to survive middle school she needs to seriously regroup and find some new friends. But how? She bites into the cupcake her mother packed her for lunch and for a second closes her eyes. The sweet treat makes her happy—finally something goes right! Looking around her table, Katie notices the other students seeming a bit lost, as well. Which gives her an idea…With three new friends Katie forms a club as a way to spread the cupcake love and earn some cupcake cash.


*Dear Dumb Diary by Jim Benton   (5.1-5.9)
Read the hilarious, candid (& sometimes mean) diaries of Jamie Kelly, who promises that everything in her diary is true...or at least as true as it needs to be. In this book, Jamie contends with Angeline, the school's prettiest, most popular girl (who Jamie thinks is a goon!) and the impending visit of her troll-like little cousin. Will Jamie survive? Will she go mad? Will she send her mom's nasty casserole to starving children in Wheretheheckistan? You'll just have to read the first installment of Dear Dumb Diary to find out!

*Dear Know-It-All by Rachel Wise   (4.0-4.7) 
Every middle-school girl has questions about her future, but to star school newspaper reporter Samantha Martone, getting the scoop is her life. Sam plans to travel the world someday as a journalist, and in the meantime she’s thrilled that her newspaper adviser, Mr. Trigg, has chosen her for a special gig: For the next year, she’ll be the school’s anonymous advice columnist. Being the voice of “Dear Know-It-All” is exciting, and an important secret to keep—especially when Sam figures out that one of the letters she receives is actually from her best friend. Sam’s mortified to learn her BFF also has a crush on fellow newspaper staffer—and pitcher for the baseball team—Michael Lawrence. Can Sam still give good advice when her own love interest is on the line?

*Dork Diaries by Rachel Renee Russel  (4.2-4.9)
Meet Nikki Maxwell! She’s starting eighth grade at a new school—and her very first diary packed with hilarious stories and art in Book One of the #1 New York Times bestselling Dork Diaries series!

Nikki confesses all in her first diary ever: her epic battle with her mom for an iPhone, meeting her new soon-to-be BFFs Chloe and Zoey, falling for adorably sweet crush Brandon, dealing with her zany little sister Brianna’s antics—and the immediate clashes with mean girl Mackenzie, who becomes Nikki’s rival in a schoolwide art competition.

*Emily Windsnap by Liz Kessler  (3.8-4.3)
For as long as she can remember, twelve-year-old Emily Windsnap has lived on a boat. And, oddly enough, for just as long, her mother has seemed anxious to keep Emily away from the water. But when Mom finally agrees to let her take swimming lessons, Emily makes a startling discovery — about her own identity, the mysterious father she’s never met, and the thrilling possibilities and perils shimmering deep below the water’s surface. With a sure sense of suspense and richly imaginative details, first-time author Liz Kessler lures us into a glorious undersea world where mermaids study shipwrecks at school and Neptune rules with an iron trident — an enchanting fantasy about family secrets, loyal friendship, and the convention-defying power of love.

*The Fairy Bell Sisters by Margaret McNamara   (4.2-4.5)

Clara Bell, Rosy Bell, Golden Bell, Sylva Bell, and baby Squeak are fairy sisters who live on Sheepskerry Island. Usually Sylva and her sisters get along just fine—but not the week of the Fairy Ball. Sylva has her heart set on going—she'll get to wear magical diamond wings and walk on beautiful satin ribbons under the stars! But fairies must be at least eight years old to attend, and poor Sylva's birthday is the day after the ball.

Sylva is sad and disappointed . . . and everything she does to help turns into a disaster. Then, on the night of the ball, Sylva senses something is wrong—very wrong. But she's made so many mistakes lately. Will she be brave enough to fly into the face of danger?

*The Fairy Godmother Academy  by Jan Bozarth  (5.0-5.6)
When Birdie goes to visit her grandmother for the first time, she learns that her grandmother is a fairy godmother—which means Birdie's a fairy godmother too! Trained by fairies in a magical land called Aventurine, human fairy godmothers have been hidden protectors of the world for centuries. Birdie' s family talisman, a singing stone, has been broken, and now only Birdie can use the stone to travel to Aventurine to repair it.


*Goddess Girls  by Joan Holub  (4.3-5.4)
Athena always knew she was smart and special, but she didn’t realize that she was a goddess! When she’s whisked away to Mount Olympus Academy, she worries about fitting in and dealing with her dad—who just happens to be Zeus. Luckily, she meets the Goddess Girls—and finds the best friends she’s ever had.




*It's Raining Cupcakes by Lisa Schroeder   (3.9)
Twelve year old Isabel is dying to get out of Willow, Oregon (population 39, 257) and experience something other than her small town. It seems that everyone gets to travel except Isabel—even her best friend, Sophie. When Isabel's mother decides to open up a cupcake shop across town, Isabel is once again stuck in Willow for the summer as she tries to help her mom get the shop up and running. But when Isabel learns of a baking contest where the finalists get an all-expense paid trip to New York City, she realizes this is her chance to finally get out of Willow. Except there are two major roadblocks to this plan: Sophie, who also is entering the contest and is always the best at everything, and her own mom, who wants her to enter the contest on her terms.Can Isabel manage to finally do something for herself, without losing her best friend and further straining her already tenuous relationship with her mother?


*Ivy and Bean by Annie Barrows  (3.1-3.9)
The moment they saw each other, Bean and Ivy knew they wouldn't be friends. But when Bean plays a joke on her sister, Nancy, and has to hidequickIvy comes to the rescue, proving that sometimes the best of friends are people never meant to like each other. Vibrant characters and lots of humor make this a charmingand addictiveintroduction to Ivy and Bean.



*Jessica Darling's It List by Megan McCafferty  (5.3)
I hadn't even gotten to homeroom yet and I'd already discovered five hard truths about junior high:
1. My best friend had turned pretty.
2. She didn't know it yet.
3. It wouldn't be long before she did.
4. That knowledge would change everything between us.
5. And there wasn't a thing I could do about it.
It's the first day of seventh grade. Is Jessica Darling doomed for dorkdom?

*Judy Moody by Megan McDonald  (3.1-3.9) 
Third grader Judy Moody is in a first day of school bad mood until she gets an assignment to create a collage all about herself and begins creating her masterpiece, the Me collage.





*Just Grace by Charise Mericle Harper   (4.2-5.3)
The third-grader Grace Stewart gets stuck with the name “Just Grace” when she tries to distinguish herself from the three other Graces in her class. Grace is plenty different, though. She has a “teeny-tiny superpower,” for instance—she can tell if someone is unhappy and often tries to fix it. When she concocts an elaborate scheme to help her neighbor Mrs. Luther feel less lonely, however, her good intentions backfire rather dramatically. Headlines such as “What Happened At Home That Was Completely Surprising” and “Spying For A Good Reason Is Not Bad” keep things lively, as do various lists (“Boy Things,” “Rooms You Can Jump In”), comic strips, and the author’s cartoonish spot art. A funny glimpse into a third-grader’s madcap world of dashed hopes, perceived enemies, possible friends, cats, and sandwiches


*Kylie Jean  by Marci Peschke   (3.1-4.1)
Kylie Jean Carter is from Jacksonville Texas. According to her Momma, she is considered "pretty" on both the outside and the inside. Ever since she was a little girl, actually a bitty baby, Kylie wanted nothing more than to be a beauty queen. It is time for the Blueberry Festival and everyone in town is busy getting ready. Momma's baking pies and Pa is picking blueberries but Kylie is thinking about becoming a queen. Every year they pick one girl to be the Blueberry Queen and Kylie knows that that tiara would look very pretty on her head. Will she be able to capture the crown of Blueberry Queen?

*A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett   (6.0)
In Frances hodgson Burnett's classic tale, Sara Crewe learns that deep down, being a real princess is an attitude of the heart. She is a gifted and well-mannered child, and Captain Crewe, her father, is an extraordinary wealthy man. Miss Minchin, headmistress of Sara's new boarding school in London, is please to treat Sara as her star pupil—a pampered little princess. But one day, Sara's father dies, and her world suddenly collapses around her. However, Sara does not break, and with the help of a monkey, an Indian lascar, and the strange, ailing gentleman next door, she not only survives her sufferings but helps those around her.

*Main Street by Ann M. Martin   (4.6-5.6)
Flora and Ruby do not want to move to Camden Falls. But they don't really have a choice -- their parents are dead and their grandmother, Min, is taking them in. It's strange to be in a new place. But luckily, it's a very welcoming place. Min runs a sewing store, Needle & Thread, at the heart of Main Street in Camden Falls. There, Flora and Ruby become friends with Olivia, who likes to organize things, and Nikki, who lives on the wrong side of the tracks. Even if Flora and Ruby never expected it to, Camden Falls becomes their home . . . and its stories become a part of their stories.


*Molly Moon by Georgia Byng (4.4-5.5)
Molly Moon is no ordinary orphan. When she finds a mysterious old book on hypnotism, she discovers she can make people do whatever she wants. But a sinister stranger is watching her every move and he'll do anything to steal her hypnotic secret...



 *My Life in Pink & Green by Lisa Greenwald   (4.4)
Twelve-year-old Lucy Desberg is a natural problem-solver. At her family’s struggling pharmacy, she has a line of makeover customers for every school dance and bat mitzvah. But all the makeup tips in the world won’t help save the business. If only she could find a way to make it the center of town again—a place where people want to spend time, like in the old days. Lucy dreams up a solution that could resuscitate the family business and help the environment, too. But will Lucy’s family stop fighting long enough to listen to a seventh-grader?

*Nancy Clancy by Jane O'Connor  (3.2-3.5)
Nancy Clancy is growing up and ready for a whole new adventure . . . in her chapter book debut!  Nancy and her best friend, Bree, have everything they need to solve a mystery, from their totally professional trench coats to their top-secret code. But when crime strikes in their classroom, will these super sleuths be able to crack the case?

Find out in the glamorous start to an all-new chapter book series featuring everyone’s favorite fancy girl!


*The Never Girls by Kiki Thorpe   (3.3-3.8)
Kate craves adventure and excitement.
Mia loves dresses, roses, and anything beautiful.
Lainey dreams of talking to animals.
Gabby believes in fairies more than anyone.

In a blink of an eye, these four best friends all get their biggest wish—they’re whisked off to Never Land, home to Tinker Bell and her fairy friends. The adventure of a lifetime is just beginning! But how will the Never Girls ever get home again?

*Olivia Kidney by Ellen Potter   (4.9-5.3)
Olivia Kidney has just moved to another new apartment building, and Olivia's the new kid in school, again. Olivia thinks she's fed up with new places . . . until she gets a look at her building! Sure, it looks normal from the outside, but inside things are crazy. There are talking lizards crawling everywhere. An exiled princess haunts the hallways, and Olivia finds one apartment made entirely of glass! She's meeting fantastical characters and seeing wondrous sights that make Alice's Adventures in Wonderland seem tame. But among all the ghosts and pirates and princesses, can Olivia find a friend?

*Our Only May Amelia by Jennifer Holm  (4.8)
It isn′t easy being a pioneer in the state of Washington in 1899, but it′s particularly hard when you are the only girl ever born in the new settlement. With seven older brothers and a love of adventure, May Amelia Jackson just can′t seem to abide her family′s insistence that she behave like a Proper Young Lady. She′s sure she could do better if only there were at least one other girl living along the banks of the Nasel River. And now that Mama′s going to have a baby, maybe there′s hope.



*Pandora by Carolyn Hennesy (5.5-5.7)
Pandora Atheneus Andromaeche Helena (or Pandy for short) has the perfect prop for her school project: a box given to her father by Zeus himself. Pandy knows the box must never be opened, but of course accidents happen and soon seven forms of evil and misery have escaped. Now it's up to Pandora to capture all seven--starting with jealousy--or go down in history as the girl who ruined the world.
 

 *Pegasus by Kate O'Hearn   (4.4-4.8)
When Pegasus crashes onto a Manhattan roof during a terrible storm, thirteen-year-old Emily’s life changes forever. Suddenly allied with a winged horse she’d always thought was mythical, Emily is thrust into the center of a fierce battle between the Roman gods and a terrifying race of multiarmed stone warriors called the Nirads. Emily must team up with a thief named Paelen, the goddess Diana, and a mortal boy named Joel in order to return Pegasus to Olympus and rescue the gods from a certain death. 

 *The Penderwicks by Jane Birdsall   (4.7-5.6)
The eventful summer of the four motherless Penderwick girls (ages 12, 11, 10, and 4) is spent in Arundel, a sprawling estate in the Berkshires. During their vacation, each of the youthful Penderwicks learns a relatively painless life lesson as the reader saunters with them, hoping the experience will never end.



*Penelope Crumb by Shawn Stout   (4.1-4.3)
Penelope Crumb is no ordinary fourth grader. She carries around a red toolbox that used to belong to her father (who's been dead since Penelope was a baby), she keeps a list for the government chronicling the many ways in which her brother is turning into an alien, she helps her home-schooled neighbor Littie with her many projects--including the construction of a marshmallow helmet--and also, she can draw pretty much anything. So when her best friend Patsy has to draw a picture of Penelope for class, she attributes the big nose Patsy gives her to Patsy's poor art skills. But then Penelope finds out that it's true! She does have a big nose! Just like her Grandpa Felix, who's been gone from her life since before she can remember. What follows is a sweet and funny story--with tons of heart and hijinks-- about Penelope finding her grandpa and using her big nose--and his big nose--to make her family whole again.

*Poison Apple by Various Authors   (4.0-5.2)
Twelve-year-old Emma-Rose Paley has always felt different from her bubbly, outgoing parents. Unlike them, Emma-Rose has pale skin and jet-black hair, is quiet and moody, and prefers gray weather to sunshine. She also hates the taste of garlic, has very sharp incisors, and loves rare burgers. When Emma-Rose uncovers a dark family secret, she has a sudden revelation. Could Emma-Rose be a real, live vampire?



*Popularity Papers by Amy Ignatow   (3.4-4.3)
Lydia Goldblatt and Julie Graham-Chang are best friends with one goal: to crack the code of popularity. Lydia’s the bold one: aspiring theater star, stick-fighting enthusiast, human guinea pig. Julie’s the shy one: observer and artist, accidental field hockey star, faithful recorder. In this notebook they write down their observations and carry out experiments to try to determine what makes the popular girls tick. But somehow, when Lydia and Julie try to imitate the popular girls, their efforts don’t translate into instant popularity. Lydia ends up with a bald spot, their parents won’t stop yelling, and Julie finds herself the number-one crush of Roland Asbjørnsen. Worse, they seem to be drifting farther and farther from their goal—and each other.

*Rainbow Magic by Daisy Meadows  (4.0-5.0)
Fairyland is home to seven colorful sisters. Together, they are the Rainbow Fairies! They keep Fairyland dazzling and bright. But when evil Jack Frost sends them far away, the sisters are in big trouble. If they don't return soon, Fairyland is doomed to be gray forever!  Rachel and Kirsty discover Ruby the Red Fairy in the pot at the end of the rainbow. Can they help find the rest of her Rainbow sisters . . . before it's too late?



*The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett  (6.3)
A beautiful and timeless story about friendship, secrets, and the power of the human spirit, The Secret Garden tells the story of orphaned Mary Lennox, who is sent to live in her uncle's house on the Yorkshire moors. With the tragic death of her uncle's wife ten years earlier the house is an unhappy one. Miserable and lonely, Mary starts to explore the house's gardens and soon discovers a key to the secret garden her uncle had sealed off. There she discovers a secret so important, so enchanting, that it will change her life forever.

*Sew Zoey by Chloe Taylor   (3.8-4.8)
Over the summer, fashion-loving Zoey Webber gets the best news ever: Her middle school is getting rid of uniforms! There’s just one problem. Zoey has sketchbooks full of fashion designs, but nothing to wear! So with a little help from her best friends Kate and Priti, she learns to make her own clothes. She even begins to post her fashion design sketches online in a blog. That’s how the Sew Zoey blog begins, and soon it becomes much more.  Zoey’s quirky style makes her a bit of a misfit at middle school, but her Sew Zoey blog quickly gains a dedicated following. Real fashion designers start to read it! Yet even as her blog takes off, Zoey still has to deal with homework, crushes, and P.E. class. And when the principal asks her to design a dress for the school’s fashion-show fund-raiser, Zoey can’t wait to start sewing! But what will happen when her two worlds collide?


*The Sisters 8 by Lauren Baratz-Logstead  (4.8-4.9)
A rather large problem has befallen the Huit girls. (Sisters, actually. Octuplets to be exact.) One particular New Year's Eve, the girls wait for their mommy to bring them hot chocolate and their daddy to return with more wood for the fire. But they don't. Mommy and Daddy, that is. They're gone. Poof! Maybe dead—no one knows for sure. You must see the problem here. Eight little girls on their own, no mommy or daddy to take care of them. This is not a good thing. So now these little girls, must take care of themselves. Get to school, cook the meals, feed the cats (eight of them, too), and pay the bills. They can't ask for help, oh no. Any self-respecting adult would surely call in social
services, and those well-meaning people would have to split them up. After losing their parents, being split up would be completely unbearable. At the same time, the question remains:What happened to Mommy and Daddy? The Sisters Eight (as they are called, affectionately and otherwise) are determined to find out. Luckily, they do seem to have someone or something helping them. Notes keep appearing behind a loose brick in the fireplace. It's a good old-fashioned mystery with missing (or dead) parents, nosy neighbors, talking refrigerators, foul-smelling fruitcake (is there any other kind?), and even a little magic. Eight little girls, eight cats, and one big mystery—let the fun begin!


*Winnie the Horse Gentler by Dandi Daley Mackall   (3.8-4.1)
Twelve-year-old Winnie Willis has a way with horses. She can gentle the wildest mare, but other parts of her life don't always come as easily. Along with her dad and sister, Lizzy, Winnie is learning how to live without her mom, who was also a natural horse gentler. As Winnie teaches her horses about unconditional love and blind trust, God shows Winnie that he can be trusted too. Readers will be hooked on the series' vivid characters, whose quirky personalities fill Winnie's life with friendship and adventure.


*Winterling by Sarah Prineas   (4.9)
 “We live here, my girl, because it is close to the Way, and echoes of its magic are felt in our world. The Way is a path leading to another place, where the people are governed by different rules. Magic runs through them and their land.”

With her boundless curiosity and wild spirit, Fer has always felt that she doesn’t belong. Not when the forest is calling to her, when the rush of wind through branches feels more real than school or the quiet farms near her house. Then she saves an injured creature—he looks like a boy, but he’s really something else. He knows who Fer truly is, and invites her through the Way, a passage to a strange, dangerous land.

Fer feels an instant attachment to this realm, where magic is real and oaths forge bonds stronger than iron. But a powerful huntress named the Mór rules here, and Fer can sense that the land is perilously out of balance. Fer must unlock the secrets about the parents she never knew and claim her true place before the worlds on both sides of the Way descend into endless winter.


*All book descriptions are from the Barnes & Noble website.

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